September 2014 CTE Newsletter

RLC Panel Discussion on September 9!

RLC Panel 09SEP14

SPSU’s Research Learning Community provides a platform for faculty from various disciplines at SPSU to actively engage in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).  Since its inception in 2011, RLC research findings have been presented at numerous conferences and in multiple journals.  On Tuesday, September 9th from 12:00 – 12:50 PM in the CTE (H-202), a panel of current RLC members will be on hand to answer any questions about the RLC.  Tentatively, the panel will include RLC members: Lori Lowder, Donna Colebeck and Keely Clay. Any faculty member who is considering joining or wanting to learn more is encouraged to attend.  Lunch will be provided to those who sign-up by Friday, September 5th.

 

New Training Workshop: Blackboard Collaborate

This ninety-minute, hands-on workshop provides the learner with the information necessary to begin using Blackboard Collaborate for online course delivery. This workshop will also include the pedagogical functions for improving faculty-to-student interaction, student-to-student interaction, and maintaining a synchronous connection with students on a regular basis. (Please note Blackboard is the replacement for Wimba. Wimba will not be available to faculty after December 2014.) 

Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Create a Collaborate session
  • Perform the first time setup
  • Configure audio and video settings
  • Navigate the Blackboard Collaborate interface
  • Upload and share content
  • Record and archive sessions
  • Access archived sessions
  • Utilize the presenter tools within Collaborate

There are several schools in the USG already using this program.  Many have noted the convenience it allows through mobile usability.  One staff member from the University of West Georgia notes, “Support for Android devices helps our accessibility initiative by giving students more options for communicating with their instructors at a distance. Students can attend a quick, on-the-go tutoring session or drop into an instructor’s virtual office via their Android Smartphone. No computer required.”

The training will be offered throughout the entire month of September with morning and evening options for faculty.  Please check the CTE calendar on the website as well the Upcoming Events page on this blog site for more information.

 

Book Club

This semester, the Book Club will be reading Teaching at Its Best by Linda Nilson.  Below you will find the publisher’s description

fall 2014 book image

 

Publisher’s Description:

This expanded and updated edition of the best-selling handbook is an essential toolbox, full of hundreds of practical teaching techniques, classroom activities and exercises, for the new or experienced college instructor. This new edition includes updated information on the Millennial student, more research from cognitive psychology, a focus on outcomes maps, the latest legal options on copyright issues, and more. It will also include entirely new chapters on matching teaching methods with learning outcomes, inquiry-guide learning, and using visuals to teach, as well as section on the Socratic method, SCALE-UP classrooms, and more.

This month, the Book Club will meet 9/10 and 9/24 at 12noon in the CTE.  

 

Did know?

The purpose of the CTE is more than just training in advising and learning management systems?  CTE offers programming in improving your teaching in the classroom through the Teaching Partners Program and Mid-term Student Surveys.  Visit the CTE website for more information!

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August 2014 CTE Newsletter

Welcome Back from the CTE!

As we start our consolidation year into the “New U,” the CTE will still be just as active with events and workshops to enhance our work in the classroom!  Here is a sneak peek to some of our major events this semester:

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Fall Workshop

Wednesday, October 22, 2014 11:00am – 1:00pm

SoTL will hosting a Fall Workshop in October that promises to offer valuable information that can be applied in the classroom.  Please mark your calendars for this major fall event and look for updates from the CTE as the event approaches.

Teaching Partners

Every year, the Center for Teaching Excellence sponsors the Teaching Partners Program.  Teaching Partners is designed to provide an opportunity for peer observation and discussion for formative feedback completely separate from the faculty evaluation process.  Participants commit to three things over the course of the semester:

  • Meet with their partner to discuss their teaching and teaching concerns
  • Observe their partners teaching and be observed by their partner (either in person or online depending on the modality selected by the participant)
  • Meet again with their partner to discuss their observations The program is open to anyone teaching at least one course at SPSU during the fall or spring term, either face-to-face or online.

 

If you wish to participate in Teaching Partners, contact Jennifer Vandenbussche at jvandenb@spsu.edu. Fall 2014 deadline is August 28, 2014.

2014 TADL applications are available!

The 2014 Teaching Academy for Distance Learning (TADL) is designed to be a hybrid, hands-on experience that will help you develop the competencies necessary for designing, developing, and delivering an online course. TADL will include the new rubric that integrates Quality Matters criteria. While the TADL format is changed from previous years and all classes will be held in Fall 2014. If you choose to develop an online course as a part of your TADL experience, the deadline for submitting the course for assessment will be April 1, 2015.

  • TADL for 2014 will be limited to 18 participants.
  • TADL Application Deadline: August 29, 2014
  • TADL Session Dates: September 5 –November 21, 2014 (see CTE calendar for information on session formats.)
  • TADL Graduation Date:December 5, 2014

For more information and the application form and directions go to: http://spsu.edu/instructionaldesignsupport/TADL/application.htm or contact Brichaya Shah bshah@spsu.edu with questions.

Mid-term Student Surveys

Faculty can select to have a mid-term survey distributed in their classes and receive a summary of the results so they can choose to implement changes to their courses prior to the end of the semester.  Mid-term surveys will be administered during the first two weeks of October.  Please contact Sonia Toson if you would like to administer this survey in one or more of your classes.

 

Upcoming CTE Events

August

Deadlines

8/28/2014 – Teaching Partners applications are due

8/29/14 – TADL applications are due

 

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)

RLC Meetings begin

August 20, 12noon-12:50 in CTE

Book Club meetings begin

August 27, 12noon-12:50 in CTE

To register for any workshop, please click here

“Advising, Counseling and Mentoring”

August 27, 12noon-1:00pm in CTE

 

Please check the CTE website and your CTE office calendar for other August workshops.

  

Book Club

This semester, the Book Club will be reading Teaching at Its Best by Linda Nilson.  Below you will find the publisher’s description.

fall 2014 book image

Publisher’s Description:

This expanded and updated edition of the best-selling handbook is an essential toolbox, full of hundreds of practical teaching techniques, classroom activities and exercises, for the new or experienced college instructor. This new edition includes updated information on the Millennial student, more research from cognitive psychology, a focus on outcomes maps, the latest legal options on copyright issues, and more. It will also include entirely new chapters on matching teaching methods with learning outcomes, inquiry-guide learning, and using visuals to teach, as well as section on the Socratic method, SCALE-UP classrooms, and more.

This month, the Book Club will meet 8/27 at 12noon in the CTE.  

 

Did you know?

The purpose of the CTE is more than just training in advising and learning management systems?  CTE offers programming in improving your teaching in the classroom through the Teaching Partners Program and Mid-term Student Surveys.  Visit the CTE website for more information!

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February CTE Newsletter

Come in from the Cold with CTE!

The end of January presented some icy challenges on campus and throughout the city, but we are still having events in the CTE.  One of our January events, “Legal Issues in Advising,” has been rescheduled for February 26.  Please mark your calendars.

 

February Highlight: Strategies to Encourage Students to Prepare for Class

The CTE is pleased to welcome Dr. Cynthia Alby from Georgia College to present a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) workshop/lunch February 18, 2014 in the eXecutive Dining Room.

When every student has prepared for class (and prepared thoroughly), the amount of learning that can take place is often drastically increased. How often have you had your day’s plans fall apart because students had not completed the assignment needed to fully participate? Professors should be able to count on students to complete the vital work outside of class. More and more professors are “flipping” their classes, which becomes more critical. This workshop examines a wide range of strategies from which a professor can pick and choose to create a custom plan to help move students in the right direction.

Dr. Cynthia Alby from Georgia College will speaking in the CTE about development strategies that professors can use to create custom learning plans for students in class.  Space is limited to the first 25 registrants so be sure to register quickly! The event will take place, 2/18/2014 from 11:00am – 1:00pm in the eXecutive Dining Room.

 

GoTo Meeting Tools Training

We will soon be transitioning from Wimba to GoTo Meeting for synchronous communication in the classroom and in online classes.  Please be sure to register for the Tools Training workshops that provide the basics for GoTo Meeting in the CTE.  To register for GoTo Meeting training, please click here.

 

Workshops in February

The CTE will be offering numerous workshops during the month of February and all faculty members are encouraged to register and participate.  

Book Club

We’re Losing Our Minds: Rethinking American Higher Education

Richard P. Keeling, Richard H. Hersh

About the book:   America is being held back by the quality and quantity of learning in college. This is a true educational emergency! Many college graduates cannot think critically, write effectively, solve problems, understand complex issues, or meet employers’ expectations. We are losing our minds–and endangering our social, economic, and scientific leadership. Critics say higher education costs too much and should be more efficient but the real problem is value, not cost–financial “solutions” alone won’t work. In this book, Hersh and Keeling argue that the only solution–making learning the highest priority in college–demands fundamental change throughout higher education.

This month, the Book Club will meet 2/6 and 2/20 at 12noon in the CTE. 

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January CTE Newsletter

Happy New Year from the CTE!

It’s the start of the spring semester at SPSU and while all of us will be busy with new courses and possibly working on some of the consolidation working groups, there will be a great deal of activity still happening in the CTE.  Below are a few highlights for each month this semester:

January – “Legal Issues in Advising,” 1/29/2014 at 12noon in the CTE

February – “The Accessible Classroom: Teaching Students with Disabilities,” 2/10/2014 12noon in CTE

SoTL Workshop – When every student has prepared for class (and prepared thoroughly), the amount of learning that can take place is often drastically increased. How often have you had your day’s plans fall apart because students had not completed the assignment needed to fully partici- pate? Professors should be able to count on students to complete the vital work outside of class. More and more professors are “flipping” their classes, which becomes more critical. This workshop examines a wide range of strategies from which a professor can pick and choose to create a custom plan to help move students in the right direction.

Dr. Cynthia Alby from Georgia College will speaking about development strategies that professors can use to create custom learning plans for students in class.  2/18/2014  12noon, LUNCH WILL BE SERVED, space is limited to 25. Register early!

March – “Social Media and the Academic: Uses in the Classroom and Branding Your Research,” 3/11/2014  12noon in the CTE

April – Master Advisor Portfolio Presentations 4/7, 4/10 and 4/14/2014 12noon in the CTE

We hope that you will be able to attend these events and others sponsored by the CTE this semester!

Teaching Partners

Information provided by Jennifer Vandenbussche

The invitation was extended by email to all full-time and part-time faculty (including those of you teaching online) to participate in the Teaching Partners program this semester.  For those of you who are not familiar with it, the program pairs interested faculty with a faculty partner for the semester.  Partners get together and observe each other’s classes, and then give each other feedback.  The feedback you get is yours and yours only.

Hopefully those of you who have participated in the program before have found it helpful will sign up again.  If you haven’t participated before, please give it a try – the time commitment is very low, and the list of possible benefits is long!  If you are looking to get something in particular out of the program (be partnered with someone experienced, someone in a particular school, etc.), every effort will be made to accommodate your request.

If you think you might be interested, fill out the application and return it to me via email or campus mail by Friday, January 24.  If you have any questions, please contact Jennifer Vandenbussche (jvandenb@spsu.edu).

 

Workshops in January

The CTE will be offering numerous workshops during the month of January and all faculty members are encouraged to register and participate.  Below is a short list of highlights for the month:

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)

RLC Meeting

January 28, 12noon-1:00pm in CTE

Book Club

January 23, 12noon-1:00pm in CTE

Teaching Excellence To register for any workshop, please click here

Enhancing Face-to-Face Teaching Using Technology

January 29, 12noon-1:00pm in CTE Computer Classroom

Advising To register for any workshop, please click here

Legal Issues in Advising

January 29, 12noon-1:00pm in CTE

Please check the CTE website and your CTE office calendar for other January workshops.

 

 

Book Club

Spring 2014 book club image

We’re Losing Our Minds: Rethinking American Higher Education
Richard P. Keeling, Richard H. Hersh

About the book:   America is being held back by the quality and quantity of learning in college. This is a true educational emergency! Many college graduates cannot think critically, write effectively, solve problems, understand complex issues, or meet employers’ expectations. We are losing our minds–and endangering our social, economic, and scientific leadership. Critics say higher education costs too much and should be more efficient but the real problem is value, not cost–financial “solutions” alone won’t work. In this book, Hersh and Keeling argue that the only solution–making learning the highest priority in college–demands fundamental change throughout higher education.

This month, the Book Club will meet 1/23 at 12noon in the CTE.

 

Did know?

The purpose of the CTE is more than just training in advising and learning management systems?  CTE offers programming in improving your teaching in the classroom through the Teaching Partners Program, Mid-term Student Surveys and Improving Teaching Consultations.  Visit the CTE website for more information!

Leave a comment

January 23, 2014 · 1:52 pm

November CTE Newsletter

Fizzle or Finale: The Final Day of Class

As you look toward the end of the semester, consider how you might spend the last day of class. While it is certainly a time to celebrate (for students and faculty alike), consider the ways in which you might make the last day of your class as impactful as the first. The following article contains a few short tips on making the last day of class one to remember.

This is an abbreviated version of the article. The link to the full article can be found here: http://www.duq.edu/about/centers-and-institutes/center-for-teaching-excellence/teaching-and-learning/fizzle-or-finale-on-the-final-day-of-class

 

 “For many. . , the last day of class comes and goes without ceremony, yet it provides an opportunity to bring the student-teacher experience to a close in a way that students appreciate and enjoy” (Lucas and Bernstein, 2008).

 

How can you make the final day into a finale?

 

·         Summarize the course content To learn more, access full article here.

·         Give a Memento To learn more, access full article here.

·         Pass the Torch To learn more, access full article here.

·         Make Emotional Connections To learn more, access full article here.

·         Encourage and Inspire To learn more, access full article here.

·         Celebrate Students’ Work To learn more, access full article here.

 
Resources:

Heppner, F. (2007). Teaching the large class: a guidebook for instructors with multitudes. San Francisco: Joosey-Bass, 2007.

Lucas, S. and Bernstein, D. (2005). Teaching Psychology: a step by step guide. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Uhl, C. (2005). The last class. College Teaching 53(4): 165-166.

 

Last Month in the CTE…

In October, the CTE hosted many workshops.  We concluded the Annual Advising Updates as well as hosted four Teaching Excellence workshops.  The highlight of last month would be the Teacher of the Year Panel held in the eXecutive Dining Hall October 31st.  The panel of former Teacher of the Year award recipients provided valuable insight into excellence in teaching as well as some of their best practices.

 

 

 

GoTo Meeting Training to Begin this Month

Blackboard Inc. ends support for Wimba Classroom December 2014. To replace this service for hybrid and online courses, the department of the University Information Technology Services (UITS) decided to implement GoToTraining paired with a “content delivery network” (CDN) for storing and redistributing recorded content. When fully operational, these two services combined will replace Wimba Classroom’s functionality. 

 

GoToTraining is a web application that can used by faculty at SPSU to deliver synchronous instruction online.  

Here are some of the basic features of  GoToTraining:

•Allows synchronous communication

•Instant Audio-Visual communication

•Asynchronous options

•Students can use recordings to reinforce learning

•Fulfill online course review standards

•Provides Digital Media Content

•Supports student engagement 

Workshops will be offered on the following days.  Times are detailed in the Upcoming Events section of the blog:

 November 4

November 5

November 6

November 13

November 14

November 22

 

Workshops in November

The CTE will be offering numerous workshops during the month of November and all faculty members are encouraged to register and participate.  Below is a short list of highlights for the month:

  • Advising Students on Academic Probation November 5 12noon-1:00pm

and November 8, 12noon-1:00pm

  • Social Media in Your Department: Let’s Talk Marketing and Advertising, November 11, 12noon-1:00pm
  • Linking Learning Outcomes to Course Activities, November 12, 12noon-1:00pm and November 13, 4:30pm-5:30pm
  • How Learning Works: seven Research-based Principles for Smart Teaching, November 18, 11:00am-1:00pm
  • Initiating Difficult Conversations with Students: In the Classroom (part 1 of 2), November 26, 12noon-1:00pm 

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October CTE Newsletter

Having a Problem in the Classroom?

Provided by the CTE Teaching Fellow for Teaching Excellence, Sonia Toson 
Try the “Solve a Teaching Problem” tool. Housed at the Carnegie Mellon University Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation, this interactive tool provides practical strategies to address teaching problems across the disciplines. These strategies are firmly grounded in educational research and learning principles. The tools use three simple steps to diagnose and provide strategies to solve the problem.

Instructors will first identify the problem from a detailed list of common teaching problems. Upon identifying the problem, the instructor then identifies possible reasons for the problem. The tool then produces multiple, detailed, research-based strategies to combat the problem.

Curious? Access the tool by clicking here.

This resource along with many others will be available on the soon to come CTE Teaching Best Practices Repository web page.

Last Month in the CTE…

September was a lively month with exciting workshops and events.  The RLC hosted a lunch September 4 that showcased the RLC members and their scholarly contributions.  Panelists shared their current research and pending publications in the Executive Dining Room.  We look forward to hear more about the scholarship from the RLC!

We also offered a professional development workshop entitled “An Overview of the Chinese Education System” in the CTE September 26.  This workshop was insightful for all of the participants and similar workshops will be offered during the month of October.

 

Workshops in October

The CTE will be offering numerous workshops during the month of October and all faculty members are encouraged to register and participate.  Below is a short list of highlights for the month:

  • Best Practices in College Teaching: Designing Effective Rubrics October 9, 3:00pm-4:30pm
  • Writing Effective Learning Outcomes, October 15, 12noon-1:00pm and October 16, 4:30pm-5:30pm
  • Incorporating Leadership Skills into Teaching, October 29, 12noon-1:00pm
  • Elements of Voice Recording, October 1, 12noon-1:00pm
  • The Changing Nature of the US University Classroom, October 3, 12noon-1:30pm
  • How One University is Managing Academic Integrity Issues, October 10, 12noon-1:00pm
  • Social Media in Your Department: Adding Value, Adding Followers, October 14, 12noon-1:00pm

New Programs added to the CTE Calendar

The CTE is expanding programming all the time.  We try our best to offer workshops that are vital to teaching excellence and will allow faculty to present the best in the classroom and advising.  The following programming has been added to the CTE calendar.  Please be on the look-out for reminders in the weekly emails and monthly newsletters:

  • GoTo Meeting training through IDU will begin in November
  • PLA: A Guide for Faculty is a fully online asynchronous 8-week workshop is provided to the USG through SPSU and all SPSU faculty are encouraged to participate. 

Book Club

How Learning Works

How Learning Works, by Susan Ambrose.

The Book Club discussed the following topics during the last meeting:

A students’ prior knowledge affects their learning. They sometimes come in with a pre-conceived notions about things and it is often hard to get them to change their minds.

The way students organize their knowledge affects their learning. A well organized and structured approach might help with learning and long lasting retention.

This month, the Book Club will meet 10/7 and 10/21 at 12noon in the CTE. 

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September CTE Newsletter

The Ten Worst Teaching Mistakes

by Richard M. Felder, North Carolina State University and Rebecca Brent, Education Designs, Inc.
Adapted and Reprinted from TOMORROW’S PROFESSORsm eMAIL NEWSLETTER
You may download a PDF version of the full article.

Like most faculty members, we began our academic careers with zero prior instruction on college teaching and quickly made almost every possible blunder. We’ve also been peer reviewers and mentors to colleagues, and that experience on top of our own early stumbling has given us a good sense of the most common mistakes college teachers make. In this column and one to follow we present our top ten list, in roughly increasing order of badness. Doing some of the things on the list may occasionally be justified, so we’re not telling you to avoid all of them at all costs. We are suggesting that you avoid making a habit of any of them. Further details and suggestions for improvements can be found in the full article here.

Mistake #10. When you ask a question in class, immediately call for volunteers.

You know what happens when you do that. Most of the students avoid eye contact, and either you get a response from one of the two or three who always volunteer or you answer your own question. Few students even bother to think about the question, since they know that eventually someone else will provide the answer. Further details and suggestions for improvements can be found in the full article here.

Mistake #9. Call on students cold.

You stop in mid-lecture and point your finger abruptly: “Joe, what’s the next step?” Some students are comfortable under that kind of pressure, but many could have trouble thinking of their own name. If you frequently call on students without giving them time to think (“cold-calling”), the ones who are intimidated by it won’t be following your lecture as much as praying that you don’t land on them. Even worse, as soon as you call on someone, the others breathe a sigh of relief and stop thinking. Further details and suggestions for improvements can be found in the full article here.

Mistake #8. Turn classes into PowerPoint shows.

It has become common for instructors to put their lecture notes into PowerPoint and to spend their class time mainly droning through the slides. Classes like that are generally a waste of time for everyone.3 If the students don’t have paper copies of the slides, there’s no way they can keep up. If they have the copies, they can read the slides faster than the instructor can lecture through them, the classes are exercises in boredom, the students have little incentive to show up, and many don’t. Turning classes into extended slide shows is a specific example of:

Mistake #7. Fail to provide variety in instruction.

Nonstop lecturing produces very little learning, but if good instructors never lectured they could not motivate students by occasionally sharing their experience and wisdom. Pure PowerPoint shows are ineffective, but so are lectures with no visual content-schematics, diagrams, animations, photos, video clips, etc.-for which PowerPoint is ideal. Individual student assignments alone would not teach students the critical skills of teamwork, leadership, and conflict management they will need to succeed as professionals, but team assignments alone would not promote the equally important trait of independent learning. The more variety you build in, the more effective the class is likely to be. Further details and suggestions for improvements can be found in the full article here.

Mistake #6. Have students work in groups with no individual accountability.

All students and instructors who have ever been involved with group work know the potential downside. One or two students do the work, the others coast along understanding little of what their more responsible teammates did, everyone gets the same grade, resentments and conflicts build, and the students learn nothing about high-performance teamwork and how to achieve it. The way to make group work work is cooperative learning, an exhaustively researched instructional method that effectively promotes development of both cognitive and interpersonal skills. Further details and suggestions for improvements can be found in the full article here.

Mistake #5. Fail to establish relevance.

Students learn best when they clearly perceive the relevance of course content to their interests and career goals. The “trust me” approach to education (“You may have no idea now why you need to know this stuff but trust me, in a few years you’ll see how important it is!”) doesn’t inspire students with a burning desire to learn, and those who do learn tend to be motivated only by grades. Further details and suggestions for improvements can be found in the full article here.

Mistake #4. Give tests that are too long.

Engineering professors routinely give exams that are too long for most of their students. The exams may include problems that involve a lot of time-consuming mathematical analysis and/or calculations, or problems with unfamiliar twists that may take a long time to figure out, or just too many problems. The few students who work fast enough to finish may make careless mistakes but can still do well thanks to partial credit, while those who never get to some problems or who can’t quickly figure out the tricks get failing grades. After several such experiences, many students switch to other curricula, one factor among several that cause engineering enrollments to decrease by 40% or more in the first two years of the curriculum. Further details and suggestions for improvements can be found in the full article here.

Mistake #3: Get stuck in a rut

Some instructors teach a course two or three times, feel satisfied with their lecture notes and PowerPoint slides and assignments, and don’t change a thing for the rest of their careers except maybe to update a couple of references. Such courses often become mechanical for the instructors, boring for the students, and after a while, hopelessly antiquated. Things are always happening that provide incentives and opportunities for improving courses. Further details and suggestions for improvements can be found in the full article here.

Mistake #2. Teach without clear learning objectives

The traditional approach to teaching is to design lectures and assignments that cover topics listed in the syllabus, give exams on those topics, and move on. The first time most instructors think seriously about what they want students to do with the course material is when they write the exams, by which time it may be too late to provide sufficient practice in the skills required to solve the exam problems. It is pointless-and arguably unethical-to test students on skills you haven’t really taught. Further details and suggestions for improvements can be found in the full article here.

Mistake #1. Disrespect students.

How much students learn in a course depends to a great extent on the instructor’s attitude. Two different instructors could teach the same material to the same group of students using the same methods, give identical exams, and get dramatically different results. Under one teacher, the students might get good grades and give high ratings to the course and instructor; under the other teacher, the grades could be low, the ratings could be abysmal, and if the course is a gateway to the curriculum, many of the students might not be there next semester. The difference between the students’ performance in the two classes could easily stem from the instructors’ attitudes. If Instructor A conveys respect for the students and a sense that he/she cares about their learning and Instructor B appears indifferent and/or disrespectful, the differences in exam grades and ratings should come as no surprise. Even if you genuinely respect and care about your students, you can unintentionally give them the opposite sense. Further details and suggestions for improvements can be found in the full article here.

New Programs added to the CTE Calendar

The CTE is expanding programming all the time.  We try our best to offer workshops that are vital to teaching excellence and will allow faculty to present the best in the classroom and advising.  The following programming has been added to the CTE calendar.  Please be on the look-out for reminders in the weekly emails and monthly newsletters:

  • Asynchronous Part-time Faculty Aadvisor Training in D2L – This workshop will allow part-time faculty the opportunity to best …..?  This is a workshop required for all part-time faculty (unless they successfully completed it in 2010) and provide an overview of advising at SPSU including the role of part-time faculty, resource referrals, etc  We also need to include how many modules and approximate time to complete, etc.
  • GoTo Meeting training through IDU will begin in October
  • PLA: A Guide for Faculty is a fully online asynchronous 8-week workshop is provided to the USG through SPSU and all SPSU faculty are encouraged to participate. Include a link to the flier, the dates listed here,

A Note about Mandatory Advising Sessions

If your department is requested a specialized advising session, your attendance in that session will count toward completing the 2013-2014 Mandatory Advising Update.

Mid-term Student Surveys

Faculty can select to have a mid-term survey distributed in their classes and receive a summary of the results so they can choose to implement changes to their courses prior to the end of the semester.  Mid-term surveys will be administered during the first two weeks of October.  Please contact Sonia Toson if you would like to have this survey administered in one or more of your classes.

Upcoming CTE Events

September

Deadlines

9/4/2013-9/17/2013 – Mandatory Advising Updates

9/13/2013 – Teaching Partners applications are due

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)

RLC Panel Discussion

September 4, 11:00am – 1:00pm in CTE

RLC Meeting

September 4, 12noon-12:50 in CTE

September 18, 12noon-12:50 in CTE

Book Club

September 9, 12noon-12:50 in CTE

September 23, 12noon-12:50 in CTE

Workshops.  To register for any workshop, please click here

“Social Media in Your Department: Getting Started, Moving Forward”

September 16, 12noon-1:00pm in CTE

Advising

DegreeWorks for Advisors

September 4, 10:00am-12noon, 2:00pm-4:00pm, 4:00pm-6:00pm in CTE

September 6, 10:00am-12noon in CTE

September 10, 10:00am-12noon, 4:00pm-6:00pm in CTE

September 13, 12noon-1:00pm in CTE

September 16, 2:00pm-4:00pm

September 17, 11:00am-1:00pm in CTE

Introduction to Master Advisors Program

September 11, 4:00pm-5:00pm in CTE

September 12, 12noon-1:00pm in CTE

Tools Training

What’s New in D2L

September 18 2pm-4pm in CTE

September 26, 10:00am-12noon in CTE

Content Tool

September 19, 10:00am -11:00am in CTE

Dropbox Tool

September 24, 1:00pm -2:00pm in CTE

Discussion Tool

September 25, 2:00pm-3:00pm in CTE

UITS Product Demonstration

A/V Controls Product Demo

September 20, 10:00am – 11:00am in CTE

Please check the CTE website and your CTE office calendar for other September workshops.

Book Club

How Learning Works

How Learning Works, by Susan Ambrose.

Publisher’s Description: Distilling the research literature and translating the scientific approach into language relevant to a college or university teacher, this book introduces seven general principles of how students learn. The authors have drawn on research from a breadth of perspectives (cognitive, developmental, and social psychology; educational research; anthropology; demographics; organizational behavior) to identify a set of key principles underlying learning, from how effective organization enhances retrieval and use of information to what impacts motivation. Integrating theory with real-classroom examples in practice, this book helps faculty to apply cognitive science advances to improve their own teaching.

This month, the Book Club will meet 9/9 and 9/23 at 12noon in the CTE. 

Did know?

The purpose of the CTE is more than just training in advising and learning management systems?  CTE offers programming in improving your teaching in the classroom through the Teaching Partners Program, Mid-term Student Surveys and Improving Teaching Consultations.  Visit the CTE website for more information!

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